FAQs.

Do you ship to my country?

Comfe Designs is based in the United States. We ship to most countries. If you’re in Asia, Australia, Canada, or Europe, we look forward to fulfilling your order. If you have a special shipping request or aren’t sure about your country, please contact us and we’ll do our best to accommodate your request. There is a fee for international shipments. We are governed and abide by all laws of the United States regarding international commerce and shipments to other countries.

What is 3D knitting?

Real 3D knitting is recognized as a modern innovative textile manufacturing format that precisely engineers yarns and fabric variations solely where they are needed for creating load or performance mapped products with a virtually seamless fit. It combines machine programming software and complex automated knitting machinery.

The knits are specially engineered for performance to create light weight designs that minimize excess materials and feature only the essentials. Mapping added strength, stretch, compression, hardware inserts, and dimensionally stable regions are easily built into the fabric digitally with transitional stitches, produced efficiently and consistently with minimal sewing or finishing.

Knitting has been around for thousands of years. 3D knitting began as little as 20 years ago in Japan within hosiery markets. As the technology was adopted, other industries like sportswear began to realize there were applications outside of hosiery and lingerie. Today nearly all industries utilizing textiles also participate in 3D knitting.

Are there any 3D knitters in the United States?

There are! Even though much of the capacity is outsourced to Asia, you can still find capacity in the US. Most is located near major metro areas—New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles, etc. There are plenty of independent designers doing the work as well as a few major corporations.

One of the best resources is Stoll in New York. We also have an extensive network of designers. If you’re looking for someone with specific skills, send us a note (btm right) and we’ll search our network.

How many kinds of 3D knitting are there?

There are at least 2 kinds of 3D knitting, and more are likely to come. Those are:

  • Flat Knitting – a row of flat knit needles controlled by a machine head that looks like a giant ribbon printer.
  • Circular Knitting – similar to flat knitting except that the knit happens in a cylinder tube instead of on a flat bed.

These differ from the type of knitting being done, i.e., Warp Knitting and Weft Knitting. Warp is a high-capacity seamless knitting that uses a warp patterning and is mainly used for creating fabrics to cut and sew. Most 3D knitting is a Weft knit patterning.

We’ve written more extensively on this subject on our blog. And here’s a good video explaining some of the differences.

Are seamless knitting and 3D knitting the same?

No. 3D knitting creates actual 3-dimensional shapes like a tennis shoe. Completely different technologies. Seamless does not necessarily mean no seams. It is actually still a “cut and sew” production and is made on weft circular equipment.

Real 3D knitting is recognized as a modern innovative textile manufacturing format that precisely engineers yarns and fabric variations solely where they are needed for creating load or performance mapped products with a virtually seamless fit.

3D integrated knit technology is not new but many people are discovering it since the Stoll, Shima, Steiger and other flat weft knit machinery that have produced this type of fabrication have become hyper efficient and cost effective.

The knits are specially engineered for performance to create light weight designs that minimize excess materials and feature only the essentials. Mapping added strength, stretch, compression, hardware inserts, and dimensionally stable regions are easily built into the fabric digitally with transitional stitches, produced efficiently and consistently with minimal sewing or finishing.

Is 3D knitting the same as 3D printing?

No. The only similarity is that they both use an additive process of layering material together to form larger structures. 3D knitting uses knit patterning as a structure and builds with yarn. 3D printing typically uses lasers to turn a resin into hardened plastic or metal, building up layer upon layer.

What is Machine Knitting and How is it Different than 3D Knitting?

3D knitting is an automated technique done by a machine that is programmed, usually through a graphical user interface. But not all knit machines can knit 3D. Some knit machines are not even automated. Many fashion schools instruct students using hand-operated knit machines. A couple great wiki articles are written on machine knitting and “complete garment” knitting to expand on these subjects. Keep in mind though that 3D knitting is not limited to consumer garments. There are myriad industrial uses.

Where can I find 3D knitting expos?

3D knitting falls under textile technology traditionally. Companies participate in many trade shows and in-house expositions worldwide. We’ve compiled a list of those we think are most important. If there’s one we don’t know about, please suggest it by sending us an email (bottom right of window).

Need something else? Send us a note.

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